“Day of Departure”

Hundreds of thousands again came out to the “Day of “Departure” protest at Cairo’s Tahrir (Liberation) Square to call for the ouster of the US-backed regime of Hosni Mubarak. At the day’s end, Mubarak had yet to depart. But with non-stop protests continuing not only in Cairo but across Egypt, the dictator’s real day of departure will come soon.

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A man holds a donkey with 'Mubarak' written on it in Arabic (matthew cassel)

A woman walks by an area near Tahrir where clashes have happened between pro-democracy protesters and Mubarark's thugs who have tried to invade the square (matthew cassel)

A couple of revolutionary soldiers take a lunch break. For the past few days, they have fought and thrown stones at Mubarak's thugs who tried to invade Tahrir Square. When asked why he was in the streets, one told me: because we're tired and we want to work, we want to eat, we want to live. (matthew cassel)

Tahrir at sunset (matthew cassel)

And this is a banner hanging from a building at Tahrir listing protesters’ demands, you can find them translated below (thanks Hicham):

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1) Bringing down the President
2) Dissolution of both houses of parliament
3) Immediate end to state of emergency
4) Formation of a transitional government of national unity
5) Elected parliament to undertake constitutional amendments to hold presidential elections
6) Immediate trials of those responsible for the murder of the revolution’s martyrs
7) Expedient trials of the corrupt and thieves of the country’s wealth

And this is a video (not shot by me) from tonight that shows protesters singing some of the chants from the past week. The chorus is, “All of us are one hand, and we have one demand: Leave! Leave! Leave!”

Tahrir Resistance

After supporters and thugs of the US backed Hosni Mubarak dictatorship tried to attack protesters staging an ongoing sit-in/protest at Tahrir Square, protesters fought back and maintained control of the square.

More on this soon, out the door to Tahrir again now …

A boy holds the victory sign after being injured on the previous night (matthew cassel)

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Thugs attack Tahrir

Thugs of the US government-backed Egyptian dictator tried to take over Tahrir Square today where anti-dictatorship protesters have been staging a sit-in and demonstrating for days.

Pro-Mubarak supporters at Tahrir Square (matthew cassel)

An anti-Mubarak protester at Tahrir Square today (matthew cassel)

An injured anti-government protester is carried away after being injured (matthew cassel)

Revolution, day and night

More than two million took to Tahrir Square yesterday to call for President Mubarak’s overthrow.

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Last night in a televised speech, US-backed Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused to give in to the demands of millions of Egyptians and step down. Outraged by the news, protesters again took to the streets and marched through downtown before arriving at Tahrir Square to meet up with the thousands who continue to protest through the night.

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An American in Tehran

Tehran. (image: matthew cassel)

An American in Tehran
The ‘Green Revolution’ won’t come as soon as we think it will.
by Matthew Cassel
http://www.inthesetimes.com/article/5736/

I awoke as the plane’s wheels touched the ground. Two women in the row ahead of me secured their scarves over their heads, and I popped some gum into my mouth to cover up any lingering scent of alcohol on my breath. Pulling up to the gate, I glimpsed the red, white and green flags with the distinctive “Allah” logo in the middle, welcoming me—I hoped—to the Islamic Republic of Iran.

I was going to Iran in the midst of ongoing protests that began following last June’s contentious presidential elections. As an American journalist who has worked in the region for years, I was invited to give a talk at a media conference on the Western media’s coverage of the Middle East.

Venezuela pics online

image: matthew cassel
image: matthew cassel

Click to see the complete gallery

Finally! After many months I’ve uploaded images I took in Venezuela back in April of this year. It was not an easy trip, I was only in the country for about a week and tried to do way too much. It usually takes me that long just to get a feel for a place before I feel comfortable walking around taking photographs, which was very hard to do on this trip. I brought only one fixed 35 mm lens so as to not stand out too much, and I also kept my camera in my bag most of the time since having uninsured gear in a tough city like Caracas is not fun — everywhere we went Venezuelans told me to be careful because I would get jumped for my gear.

Crime is high in Caracas, but I was really impressed meeting those organizing against it. In many communities in Venezuela, there is an energy similar to one I felt in Palestine earlier in the intifada, or even in Chicago in 2003 when tens of thousands were organizing against the war in Iraq. Another thing that impressed me was that just walking around we came across health clinic after health clinic that I could just enter and be treated for free by well-trained Cuban doctors. This made me feel constantly safe — the complete opposite to being in the states with no health coverage. Needless to say, I will be back in Venezuela soon.

Many thanks to my sister for her initial invitation to visit and her assistance with everything thereafter.